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Fiberglassing


Applying Fill Coats - Light and Heavy

I'm applying two different sort of fill coats in this video. One is quite light and the other is heavier. The hull will eventually get another layer of fiberglass, after I have joined the deck in place.

Fiberglassing the Petrel Deck and Hull

At the start of the day I went into the shop and turned the heat up to 80° F (27° C) and made sure the lamp I keep on my epoxy to keep it warm was turned on. This assures the epoxy flows easily.

I rolled the cloth out on the boat about an hour before I started glassing. I could have done it earlier, but I did want to give it some time to warm up to room temperature.

Installing a Solid Outer Stem

There are a couple ways to add an external stem to a kayak. While I typically use thin laminations stacked and bent and glued in place, on these boats I want a solid piece of curly maple.

Joining the Deck and Hull and Taping the Inside Seam

Joining the Deck and Hull

One of the more frequent questions I get is; "How do you put the deck back on the hull?

Glassing the Interior of the Coaming

To this point I have only glassed the outside of the coaming. Now that I have applied carbon fiber to the interior of the hul I can proceed to glassing the other side of the coaming.

Laying Carbon Fiber Cloth on the Deck Interior

Laying carbon fiber is not that different from fiberglass accept that it is black, and stays black. Where fiberglass starts white and becomes transparent when saturated with epoxy, carbon fiber stays opaque, so it can be tricky to tell if it is fully saturated.

Fiberglassing the Hull

This video shows the fiberglassing of the hull of the microBootlegger. I'm applying one layer of 4 ounce E-glass with a coat of epoxy resin. After the wet-out coat of epoxy starts to set up I apply a thin fill coat.

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