Nymph

Picture Books...

I put together a couple small photo books showing an overview of the building process for my Nymph canoe and Petrel kayak. I orginally made these to bring to shows to help explain to people how I make my boats. I got a fair number of requests from people who wanted a copy of the books, so I've put the books up on Lulu.

Changes and Corrections

Despite my best efforts some errors found their way into the offsetspublished for not just one, but all three boats in the book.

Coot

Form #1 of the Coot has the offsets shifted around a bit. They should be as shown below:

 

Coot corrected offsets

 

Nymph

The stem form of the Nymph had the waterline numbers shifted up one line, they should be as shown:

 

Trimming to a Feature Line

There are often situations where you need to trim a group of strips tofollow a line, such as a chine or keel line. You could start by eye-balling the taper on each strip and hoping when you have finished installing them all that you have a smooth, fair line or, you could install a temporary strip then fit each strip one-at-a-time against that strip, but the easiest is to start by not doing any special fitting.

Table of Contents

  • Part 1 The Background
    • 1 Introduction
      • The Strip-Building Method
      • What You Need to Build a Boat
      • Three Strip-Building Projects
    • 2 Materials
      • Wood
      • Resin
      • Reinforcing Fabrics
      • Glues
      • Tape
      • Waxed Paper
      • Paint and Varnish
    • 3 Tools
      • Hand Tools
      • Power Tools
      • Safety Equipment
    • 4 Lofting
      • Offset Tables
      • Cutting Forms
      • Aligning Forms

Form Reference Lines

I like a good set of reference lines on all my forms. These are usually supplied by gluing the paper form patterns to the MDF and leaving them there. The patterns have the reference lines so everything is good. But I'm making the Nymph and it is symmetrical so being lazy I can make two sets of forms at the same time by stacking up two pieces of MDF and cutting them both at once. But, this means the paper pattern is only on one of the two copies.

 

A quick strongback

I'm about to start building the first boats in my new shop. I'm going to exhibit at the Maine Boat Builder's Show and I need some boats to bring to it. I've decided to bring a Nymph canoe and while I am at it I figured I would build two. Unfortunately, I only have one strongback. So, yesterday I decided to build another. A strongback should be rigid and straight.

Books

Building Strip-Planked Boats & The Strip-Built Sea Kayak

Nick Schade has been building boats using the strip-built (aka strip-planked) method since 1983. Over the years he has learned a lot about the intricacies of the process by trial and error. If he can figure it out that way, so could you, but you don't need to as he has put most of what he knows into two books.

Nymph - A New Double Paddle Strip Canoe Design

Plans Now Available

In July I finished up the prototype of a new canoe design. The Nymph is a 10' long by 28" wide solo double-paddle canoe. It is designed for paddlers under 150 lbs and the prototype weighs about 15 pounds. I am experimenting with building boats with domestic hardwoods to find alternatives for old-growth cedar. In this boat I used walnut and basswood cut into 1/8th inch thick strips.

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