You are here


New England Intermediate Rough Water Symposium

Jun 11 2010 12:00 pm
Jun 13 2010 4:00 pm

A hand made wooden kayak is not truly finished until you have put your first scratch in it. The New England Rough Water Symposium is a chance to see to it that your boat is well and fully complete along with few scratches to prove it. While "rough water" may sound scary, this is a good event for a wide range of paddlers from the novice through experienced paddlers. It will give you a chance to learn from top paddler how to use your boat to full effect.

Chesapeake Light Craft OkoumeFest

May 14 2010 12:00 pm
May 15 2010 3:00 pm

Once again I will be attending OkoumeFest hosted by Chesapeake Light Craft in Annapolis, MD. This is a great event to try different boats and talk to other builders. I plan to bring down my Petrel, Ganymede, Nymph and Expedition Single.

 

Smoothing the Hull Interior

The concave shape of the interior is more difficult to smooth than the exterior. The easiest tool to use is a scraper. These scrapers are not card scrapers but more like paint scrapers.

Glassing the Interior of the Coaming

To this point I have only glassed the outside of the coaming. Now that I have applied carbon fiber to the interior of the hul I can proceed to glassing the other side of the coaming.

Laying Carbon Fiber Cloth on the Deck Interior

Laying carbon fiber is not that different from fiberglass accept that it is black, and stays black. Where fiberglass starts white and becomes transparent when saturated with epoxy, carbon fiber stays opaque, so it can be tricky to tell if it is fully saturated.

Smoothing the Deck Interior

Unlike the outside where sanding is easy, the inside can be harder to to smooth. I find scrapers are the easiest way to deal with the concave surfaces.

Fiberglassing the exterior of the Coaming

After installing the riser, I glassed the outside, reinforcing the coaming and securely attaching it to the deck. The riser was initially installed using hot-melt glue which is not particularly strong.

Installing the Coaming Riser

The coaming "riser" is what I call the vertical part of the combing around the cockpit. This is made of the same wood I made the rest of the boat from. For efficiency reason I want to use the 2" wide strips I have, but these don't conform to the sharp curves at the front and back of the coaming.

Fixing a Broken Seam

While rolling out the fiberglass before glassing the deck, I ended up cracking a section on the back. The break was along a glue line.

Fairing and Glassing the Deck

This largely time-lapse video starts out with scraping and proceeds through sanding to glassing and finishing with a fill coat.

Translate Page

 

 

Syndicate

Syndicate content