You are hereCove and Bead

Cove and Bead


Cove and bead cedar strips are used to build boats quickly

Cove and Bead Strips sticky icon

A strip built boat is made of small strips of wood so if you were wondering where the name came from, now you know. The method is often called cedar strip, because the wood used is typically cedar. It does not have to be. Any straight grained, light-weight wood can be used. I have used redwood, pine, and mahogany as well as Alaskan cedar, western red cedar, northern white cedar, and atlantic white cedar.

Milling the Cove and Bead on a Router Table

How to Set Up a Router Table to cut Cove and Bead Cedar Strips

Cut the Bead First

I like to cut the bead first because it will not get dinged up with any rough handling. The cove is more delicate due to the narrow edges. By cutting the bead first there will be fewer opportunities for damage between milling the cove and assembling the strip on your boat.

Making the Coaming Recess for a Strip Kayak

Cutting Out the Cockpit

I made a paper pattern to define the size and shape of the cockpit recess area. The one I used here shows what remains on the deck, where I could have a paper pattern that constitutes the shape of the recess. Either way works.

Stripping the deck of the Night Heron kayak using Cove and Bead cedar strips

Sheer Strips

Like the hull, I used strips taped to the bottom of a bench plane to make consistent width strips with the bead removed.

Cove and Bead Strips on a Night Heron

Starting a New Build

I'm starting on a Night Heron. This one is being made with 3/16" western red cedar strip. I'm using cove and bead strips this time to help make the build go a little faster. I'm not bothering to book match and I am stapling.

Translate Page

 

 

Syndicate

Syndicate content